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Underutilized Tech

4.6

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In a recent episode we talked about our top 10 technology concerns in the church. One of our points was the underutilized technology in churches. This week, we dive into that topic and talk about underutilized technology in areas that are generally not focused on. Some places the church is on the cutting edge. Some other areas are virtually ignored and have so much potential to aid in the mission of the church.

Online or Offline

I haven't finished listening to this weeks podcast yet, but I did also catch parts of it live on Friday. A lot of the things mentioned this week are cloud apps (online) and before a church goes rushing to move things to the web, be sure to look at the reliability of your Internet service or your ability to work where there is Internet service.

Our church is located just outside the service area for both DSL and Cable so we use a commercial wireless service. Once in a while (usually during storms) we loose our link and suddenly we feel like cavemen looking for a chisel and stone to carve out a message to someone. We use an online church management system and it can get really annoying when the link is down and a pastor is trying to pull up someone's details when they call in for community care issues or other pastoral needs.

The important thing is to be prepared to be off-line. It may look funny when your church staff take off to the nearest Starbucks, but it maybe what it takes to keep the church working during extended service outages.

Peter Awad
ChurchTechGuy.com

1Peter 4:10 ~ Are you using your gifts?

Crowd sourcing

Great podcast as usual! I did have one point I completely disagree with you on. You hit on the subject of not having your pastors or staff updating your website. While I agree that pastors or staff should not be updating the website, I do not think that volunteers should be the ones left to update content on a church website. I have a few of points on this:

1) Volunteers have inconstant skills to update websites. Web skills will vary so much with volunteers that I find very often that content will be inconsistent depending on the person updating the event, or the page with their bible study information on it. Especially if you are running your site on Joomla, or Drupal, these CMS platforms can be difficult to update for first time users.

2) Volunteer turn over. Being in ministry I have seen volunteers come and go very quickly. Then, the church will have to find someone to update the site in the down time, and then once a volunteer takes over, he or she will need to trained to update the site, once again taking time away from the staff or pastor.

3) Pastor or staff knowledge of updating the website. Training the volunteers is going to come down to someone on staff or the pastor, being as they will probably have the most knowledge of the website. Once again this will take time away from the staff or the pastor.

4) Who manages the crowd source? Someone will have to coordinate all the people updating the website. Getting logins setup, troubleshooting problems, making sure modules are working, etc.

5) What happens if your go to guy leaves? This is the biggest problem I see churches run in to. It is great that a church has people want to work with the website. It is great if you have someone who knows how to work their way through Drupal or Joomla, but what happens when they leave the church? Typically the website gets left in the dark until someone comes along who knows how to update it.

We have dedicated website managers who take ownership of our client’s website. They act as the webmaster coordinating with all the volunteers, the pastors, and the staff. They help churches develop their content, pastors, staff, or volunteers can call their manager, and they will work with them to create content for their site. They will also troubleshoot problems and teach users how to update their site, so when the volunteer webmaster leaves, they will be there to make sure that the church does not loose any ground online.

Thanks!

Jesse

Church Website Dealer
http://www.churchwebsitedealer.com

Church Website Ideas
http://www.churchwebsiteideas.com

Agree

I will agree with you Jesse. I am pastor of my church and I want to use the web to greater effectiveness as I see one of my most important roles as a pastor is communication. That is the role of the church to communicate the gospel. Now, I don't want to be loading announcements for the women's tea or for the youth garage sale - I usually have my administrative assistant and volunteers do that type of stuff at my direction. But I want to be able to use the internet for teaching and for sharing the gospel. That is why I have come to this site and want to learn how to better do that.

On the topic of using video in churches. We recently used skype to video conference on a Sunday morning with one of our overseas missionaries. It worked out great. We had the missionary projected on screen and I had a conversation from the pulpit with them. They were able to then listen in and watch the worship after the interview.

Not The Use Case

Many of the churches we encounter have the pastor doing the updates for things like the women's tea or youth garage sale. That's the problem. I don't want pastors to spend any time doing this stuff or thinking about it.

Pastors using the web to share the Gospel is a different story. I wish more did that. But, as a church at large we are still figuring out how to do that well.

Matt Farina
Geeks and God Former Co-Host
www.mattfarina.com

Pastors Should Be Pastors

A problem for many people is getting caught up in the technology. In Acts 6 the Apostles turned over certain service work to others so they could pray and minister the Word. I've seen this be forgotten in churches where pastors do a lot of work that gets in the way of praying and administering the word. We have to guard against this.

As for volunteers, you need to train them. Would I just put someone new at the welcome desk at my church and not show them what to do? Would I have them serve in the nursery without showing them where things are at and what to do? When it comes to volunteers we need to mentor and train them. This goes beyond the website but applies there as well.

Hopefully, this is done in an easy way that's able to be shared easily. That's how it should be done. I would like to see churches have some tutorial videos on how to update the site. I imagine that would make it easier for people and they you don't need to have the staff constantly teach people.

Oh, make it part of the process for handing off positions. If someone leaves and someone new comes into a position there SHOULD be a handoff. How you update the website should be handed off with any budget, guidelines, etc.

Ministries have volunteer turnover. I wonder why there is such high turnover? If there is it should be understood. Many people like to become good and what they and serve in something for a good period of time. If there's high turnover that's something else to investigate as there may be something else going on.

I used to attend a church where the youth were led by a couple volunteers. They organized the events, they taught on Sunday morning, and they were the go to people for youth. Are they more appropriate to update the website with the details of what's going on or is the pastor or church secretary. This was a small church with about 300 worshipers a weekend. This is an administrative task. A pastor has better things to do. To have a secretary do it puts delay into the loop. Do you trust these people to lead the youth of the church and not update your church website?

Who manages the crowd source? You should find a geek in your church to do it first. God gave them the gifts to do this stuff so let them do what God made them to do in service of the church. If you don't have a geek who can do this (be sure you really look first) then move on to someone else. Most of this stuff will be administrative so does anyone have that gift? It could easily be a volunteer.

You'll notice that I have a general philosophy to spread the work of the church across the members of the church. If everyone does a little we can get a lot done. When people do stuff they have ownership in the mission and are more involved. God made us different parts of the body and this lets us be those parts in service of the church. I could go on but, I think you get the point.

What happens when the webmaster leaves? This is a good question. Here are a few thoughts.

First, you should try to remove the role of webmaster as much as possible. That role isn't needed anymore. You may need a site admin to do some administrative things. But, the days of the webmaster are behind us.

I think this point is very very very important so I'll repeat it. The days of having a webmaster are now behind us.

Second, have more than one person who can administrate the site and a backup if your primary person moves on.

In general we need to rethink our processes. The staff of a church should not be a bottleneck. A church is a community and not just a place people go on Sunday.

Matt Farina
Geeks and God Former Co-Host
www.mattfarina.com

I Understand Your View

I understand your view, and I think we could go back and forth about this all day. My view comes from the churches I work with, have been a pastor at, and been a member at. In a perfect world what your saying would be great. A pastor could find a geek with enough knowledge to get a website up and running, volunteer turn over would be low, and we can setup a training program for our website. I guess my point of view comes from two things:

1) The size of churches I work with, typically around the 100 person mark.

2) My view of what a church website should be for these size churches. I have always felt that church websites should be set up to connect the people to the pastor. On our sites we track everything and for the most part, the sermon video you add to the site gets watched maybe 5 times. The sermon notes rarely get looked at. The pastor blog, gets very few hits unless he/she has something to say and knows how to run a blog. Things that matter on to people on the website: calender items, I am new sections, who we are, staff pages, services times, and contact us areas. Church websites should be a tool to connect people with people.

Also please don't misunderstand my view of volunteers. They are needed in any church. They should be valued and taken care of. Once again, I think a difference of view on what a website is used for.

Lastly, call it what you want, webmaster, site admin, web guru, IT support. They all fit the roll of someone who coordinates the whole project, steers the ship, and also fixes it when it's broken.

Once again, great podcast. I have a whole other view on your Open Source views, but I will hold those until later. I do love open source btw. :)

Jesse

Church Website Dealer
http://www.churchwebsitedealer.com

Church Website Ideas
http://www.churchwebsiteideas.com

Size does matter

You do have a point Jesse, in that the size of the church does play a roll in this. I am not a part of a church that small, but both my parents are and in one case the church is not online, the other, the pastor is looking after getting them online (he's kind of new to the church and trying to get a lot of things in gear).

But, I do wonder about some of the examples you gave.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Things that matter on to people on the website: calender items, I am new sections, who we are, staff pages, services times, and contact us areas. Church websites should be a tool to connect people with people.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IMHO 5 of these 6 sections should be fairly static and not require any of the pastors time in maintaining. "Who we are" should be as firm and solid as the old stone foundation that the church is built on. And service times shouldn't be changing a whole lot except for summer hours if applicable and maybe extra times for Christmas and Easter. But these could be addressed in a simple RSS feed on the site of Important Info.

As for the calendar, I fear that a church of 100 probably is using a pencil and paper calendar and events system by a pastor or volunteer/part-time admin person. So for online calendaring I would put them into a VERY structured drupal calendar/events system where fields are clearly defined and mandatory, or something like gCal which is so user friendly that my grandmother uses it.

I guess if I had to take a stand on the issue, I'd rather have a Pastor servicing the congregation and being in the community then putting a calendar online. I'd go so far as to say get them off-line.

Peter Awad
ChurchTechGuy.com

1Peter 4:10 ~ Are you using your gifts?

Goal

First, a word of warning. Most of the small churches in America are shrinking or dying off. So, I tend to look at their strategy very critically. The business as usual for these churches is leading to smaller sizes and less growth rather than growth. While the mission of the church is not to grow the local congregation the mission of the church is to make disciples. That should grow a congregation. And, the church in America has a negative growth rate (it's shrinking).

It's a matter of church strategy and how the website fits in that. We most likely have different strategies and goals for the sites which leads in different directions. A church should be able to stand on it's own and grow without a church website. The website is not a game changer.

My first question is what is a church. To most of America it's a place you go on Sunday morning or a place you pastor works at. The bible calls us the church. The body of Christ. So, when I look at a church website I look at it as a tool for this church and not the local building.

Pastors need to communicate with the congregation. This should be a purpose of the website. But, a lot of pastors are really really really bad at doing this. So, I get wary of putting them out there too much. According to Barna, most pastors are out of touch with their congregations and society at large. They just don't get people. So, communicating with people you don't get as a primary purpose of your site can quickly lead to failure. To just talking to the members and turning away outsiders.

There is a lot going on here and I'm only scraping the surface here. But, we need to change the way we operate and think about these communication tools. That will change with the short term mission of your church. But, there is a lot to take into account.

You are right that a church of 100 people is different than a church of 1,000 people. Not just in the church website but in lifestyle and strategy. It makes a difference whether you're a rural church, in the burbs, or in the city. There is a lot of context to it. But, that leads to different strategies and those strategies will lead to different sites. Sadly, what I see lacking is a good central strategy. Though, this is just my own experience.

OK, that's enough thoughts all over the place for now...

Matt Farina
Geeks and God Former Co-Host
www.mattfarina.com

Training?

Dalerus reminded me of a huge need in our church: training. I set up their website, but I'm leaving next year, and I need advice on how to train people to replace me. It would be great if GAG did a podcast on this.

Not another pulpit

I'm thinking part one of this podcast should have been what the church should use the internet for. Here are a few things I think its not for.
1. To present a pristine image of a perfect church. We are not perfect people and the church screwed up pristine a few hundred years ago. We are real people with bad grammer trying to make a difference in the world. Volunteers are real people and our volunteer has managed our website for several years. Yes the "about us" page should be professional edited, but the upcoming jr high bowling nite doesn't need it.
2. To preach from an electronic pulpit. The web generation is sick and tired of being preached at. They use the web to share their lives, we should be sharing our lives.

I don't mean to shoot down peoples ideas, our church is one that streams our service on sunday, but for the same reason some churches offer a Japanese service, to make it available to a large audience.
We are presently overhauling our website and the focus is to be relevant and available, but we also want to share who we are and what we do as God's people.

Back in school my english lit teacher told me to first know my audience, and second understand my audience. I think a lot of churches don't do this when utilizing the web and misuse it as much as underutilize it.

On twitter I share what's going on, on facebook I share my life (to a limit) and on my blog I share my random thoughts and ideas. No one of these (IMHO) should be tools of evangilism. When we do that we reduce the church to a sales business and ourselves to sales reps.
I try and live a God honoring life and let people see me do it through these portals into my life and when people ask why or how I do the things I do, then I share how God changed my life and let relationships grow from there.
We have to remeber that these tools are called "social" networks not sales networks.
Well its time to get off my soapbox. Its late and my thumbs are getting sore.
(Posted from my blackberry)

Peter Awad
ChurchTechGuy.com

1Peter 4:10 ~ Are you using your gifts?

Beat It To Death?

Have we beaten to death how churches should use the net? I don't want to over push that issue.

Preaching has it's place. It works in churches. Outside the church it's a communication method that doesn't work so well in this culture. Preaching does not equal the Gospel. It's a communication method for sharing something with someone. Like all communication methods it only works in certain context.

On the web, at the bar, at starbucks, or most other places it just doesn't work. So, preaching on a website is really not going to share the Gospel.

Now, something that does work is if the church lives as the church (as opposed to attending a church) and invites others into that with them. People get to see them living missionally. They can talk to the people of the church about it. And, people get invited into the church rather than being preached at. This is a much better way in our current cultural context to communicate the lifestyle and ideals of what it means to be the church.

But, that's just my 2 cents....

Matt Farina
Geeks and God Former Co-Host
www.mattfarina.com

GCal Events

The podcast mentions Google Apps and I couldn't agree more more, these are great tools for ministries. Anyone had a chance to test out the Drupal GCal Events module http://drupal.org/project/gcal_events ? Looks to be a possible alternative to just embedding the Google calendar on a site.

Phil, brilliant idea for

5

Phil, brilliant idea for using Skype w/ missionaries. I will steal this idea. Thank-you.

Jesse, the video on most church sites doesn't get watched, simply because few people will look for it there. But if you make it available as a podcast & list it in directories like iTunes, you'll get the views that way. I'm @ a tiny rural Iowa church, and my (audio) podcast gets ~300 downloads per episode over a year's time (old sermons continue to get downloaded: ~50 the first month, then a slow steady trickle), with people all over the world getting it. In the past 6 months, China accounted for 6% of our sermon downloads--China, where people can't easily get the Gospel, but I'm able to bring it to them because they found it in a directory somewhere. If we had video available, that would be one more method. I'm thinking streaming video is less important than archived & podcasted video.

Matt, excellent points about church strategy. Churches that are trying to build their congregation are dying. Churches that are trying to build the Kingdom will likely (not always) grow. Focusing on growing the congregation is a desperate act of paranoia.

I've been thinking about the concept of Newsletters. A lot of you get the Dreamhost newsletter, right? Notice how it's written as a personal letter with links to stories? Why are so many church newsletters written like a business newsletter when businesses are even moving away from that formal model to be more personal? I'm thinking we as churches need to reconsider our newsletter method. I like Matt's idea about the newsletter being a series of blog posts & events. The newsletter would just be greeting & highlights from the site. Obviously, the old person factor would require a print webless version for the untechnical, but even the print version could stand to lose the corporate structure & cheesy clipart in favor of a more personal approach with "just the facts" for each story, framed with a personal touch.

Peter, good point about evangelism. Maybe evangelism committees should be renamed & restructured to something like "social integration" instead. (Anyone have a better name?) I'll have to think about that concept.

O.K., I just got back from lunch, and I think there's something huge here, an entire paradigm shift to ministry approach, too much for here, probably a blog post (or a book) to figure it all out. It's more than social integration--it's life integration.

Finally, I love the SMS ideas. This is a great way to get prayer needs out to people, as well as integrating the church throughout the week. I like how @shrop's church does the twitter feed on their site and could imagine some of that information sent out via sms. Tons of possibilities there.

Great show--still listening.

I get more information and ideas from this podcast than 10 expensive conferences, but it makes my brain hurt and my head spin from the possibilities. That's a good thing.

Skype used in the church

Here's as a quick example of how Skype can be used in the church. One of our pastors who does a lot of marriage counseling (and is a regular speaker at Family Life conferences) told us one time that he did pre-marital counseling for a couple who was in France at the time. It was free, and it helped the church minister well outside of its geographical area.

Itunes Works!

Hello,

I totally agree our young adults site is on its 4th design and we were always looking for ways to make it accessible not only to the members of the young adults but to the people who were wanting to come and check us out. I believe that we need not only to promote ourselves but to stay relevant to what the world is doing.

ITunes is one of those ways to stay relevant. My church "The Embassy of the Kingdom of God" and it's related ministries have 7 podcasts on Itunes (main, young adults, Jr high, Sr high, youth convention, 3 days in his presence) right now plus the young adults offer 3 more podcasts that are offered as a bonus if you visit the site.

When the young adults who were the first to post sermons on the web in our church was not using Itunes we would average on a good sermon that was recorded with a mini recorder 10 to 20 visitors a month. I then started back in 2008 how to get us on Itunes after the main church website did it. Now we have hundreds of hits. Itunes and what the world is doing such as our Facebook group, feedburner, twitter & you tube account etc.. can really let your members and the world know what is going on.

I encourage anyone out there to yes promote your church but look at what the world is doing and try and reach them through those places. Even my WP blog/site promotes what my church is doing with links and ways to listen to the sermons embedded into the site. Yes on my blog I write about me and what the lord is doing in my life and what I am thinking at the time. But as stated before we need to keep up with the Tech in the world and make it relevant in our sites for today's lost. We need to be Sheppard's to the Lost Sheep of the world. We need to go after that one lost just like Jesus did. The internet and all its tools are one way

Just one mans opinion
Be Blessed!
Matthew

Visit These Great Websites
www.embassyonline.ca (Young Adults)
www.embassystudents.ca (JR & SR High)
www.theembassyofgod.com (Main Site)
www.embassyworship.com (Worship Teams)
www.durhamhop.com (Durham House of Prayer)
www.matthewdykstra.site90.com

Great podcast

5

This is the first of your podcasts I have listened to, having just found the site yesterday via Google.

I enjoyed this podcast, and I think that churches could use technology a LOT more in being effective in their work, and I particularly liked your emphasis on the use of people-oriented technology. I have spoken in the church I now go to, and I used computer-generated slides to help illustrate the point I was making.

I also really liked your promotion of free open source software, which I am a big fan of. I use Linux regularly at home, although it seems most church users still have not heard of it. It is a bit like what you said about people wanting to buy expensive software as they think it is better than free software, this is an old outdated concept that people need to lose. Churches spend too much on MS licences when they could be using something like Ubuntu for free, along with OpenOffice and Google Apps.

I look forward to hearing more of your podcasts, I have a lot of catching up to do. I certainly hope to put some of these thingss into practice and have already emailed a link to this site to my pastor.

Great podcast (2)

Now that I have registered on your site, I am following up my previous post, and wanted to add that your idea about going to computer conferences, etc., is a great idea. I have been going to these type of things (computer exhibitions) in London for many years, and most recently the Linux Expo in 2008. They had a question and answer session about Linux stuff which was very interesting. I think more church members should go to these things, especially decision makers in churches, as they can sometimes have a very outdated view of technology, thinking that computers are still like they were in the days of Windows 98.
As technology moves on, we should keep up to date and try to use it to our advantage in preaching the gospel and teaching christians in the church. Sometimes people fear new technology or maybe they just fear being left behind and not understanding the latest tech. It takes effort to keep up, but I also think that church pastors should involve members who know aout tech stuff more in the running of their church/congregation.

website links

It was mentioned in this podcast that the URLs you mentioned would be on the website. I thought perhaps the links would be on this page. Where can I find the links for the various websites mentioned?

Episode Links at the top of this page

They are right at the top of this page (below the episode description) under the title "Episode Links".

links

Sorry, I did not notice them as the links are in pale grey, with most of the links being in an easy to read orange. Having just listened to podcast 119, I think having grey links under your orange links really goes against a lot of what was said in podcast 119. If a person has to ask for the links, even though they are there, then by not seeing the links there is surely something wrong with the design. The links have to be consistent, and if one link is orange, all should be orange. BTW, podcast 119 about website tips was awesome.

WordPress for Your Site

Hey Guys,

Love to hear that you are using talking WordPress (wp) and I love that you are thinking of using your site with WP.. did you know that you can use WP as a CMS (Content Managment System) my church and even myself use it as our full site and as a CMS if you can find or design the right theme you can make WP the back end of the site. I love WP so much I use it for every site. Take a look at what I mean I have two sites and one on the way that will be full WP. So take a look and tell me what you think of these sites and give WP a try the best Free Blog & CMS on the planet. I looked a drupal and don't understand it and I absolutely hate joomala.. I saw my school board forcing the schools to use it if they want to host a site on the board system.. how sick is that.

Anyway check out these full WP sites at
http://www.embassystudents.ca
http://matthewdykstra.site90.com

Be Blessed Guys!

Visit These Great Websites
www.embassyonline.ca (Young Adults)
www.embassystudents.ca (JR & SR High)
www.theembassyofgod.com (Main Site)
www.embassyworship.com (Worship Teams)
www.durhamhop.com (Durham House of Prayer)
www.matthewdykstra.site90.com

Great Worship Leader Site

Hey,

My Church uses a site call Planning Centre at www.planningcentreonline.com and it is used by all of our worship teams to plan our Worship Services on Tuesdays & Sundays you should really take a look at it. You can setup worship plans, get song list, song pdfs or docs, mp3 & get the mp3 & m4a files and the best part of the site is that each plan and related documents and mp3 files are all used by passwords. Everything I do on the site for my Worship Leader is passworded only the authorized leaders have access to the site and access to the related files.

Just thought I would mention that.. would be nice to see that done on a show.. would be happy to do an interview on it for you guys.

Anwesome Podcast!

Visit These Great Websites
www.embassyonline.ca (Young Adults)
www.embassystudents.ca (JR & SR High)
www.theembassyofgod.com (Main Site)
www.embassyworship.com (Worship Teams)
www.durhamhop.com (Durham House of Prayer)
www.matthewdykstra.site90.com

Volunteers and updates

I agree AND disagree with some of the comments made in the show about website updates.

I agree that the Pastor should not be spending a ton of time updating the site when that isn't their primary focus. Whether the Pastor should not have to do any updates should be determined by the size of the church and whether or not the Pastor has a passion for spreading the word using technology as a tool.

Where I disagree is that at least one person needs to be responsible for making sure updates get made. Typically this should be someone who gets paid because then it's their job and not just something they are volunteering to do on the side. Office manager, youth minister, intern, or dare I say it, the pastor if he's the only one.

This also doesn't mean that volunteers can't be involved and help update - just that there needs to be someone who stays on top of things, checks in with groups and makes sure it gets done.

What I see is that there are a lot of people in churches who are older. People who can barely handle e-mail. Even when the process of updating is simplified with Drupal, Wordpress, Google Apps or what have you it still may be either something that they find tedious or simply won't take the time to do.

For example say someone volunteers to host a small home bible study and then the church expects that person to do the updates on the website for their group themselves. What if they don't realize they will be expected to keep up with a section of the website when they volunteered? Maybe they do it this once and decide that hosting a bible study isn't worth it so they don't volunteer again. This is a real life example I'm waiting to see pan out (I am not involved in this one anymore - trying not to go into great detail here but also trying to get my point across.)

Basically it boils down to needing some level of centralization within the church. There may be other ways of organizing this than what I've mentioned but I think that a backup plan needs to be discussed in case relying solely on volunteers doesn't work out.

-------

Quick questions:
- Where did you get the statistics on church growth? That 97% of church growth is people switching from one church to another? Would love to see that whole thing written down with references.

- What are your thoughts on ACS selling a web add-on "Access ACS" from what I have seen it requires people to register for a username and password in order to see what events are going on in the church (or at least it can be configured this way.) I'm not a fan but I would love to hear your opinions and experiences with Access ACS.

I Agree

Hello,

At My church..we have a dedicated team involved in the websites and yes (6 main site and about 12 sub sites) and we are involved in many other departments as well.. our worship leader heads up the main site www.theembassyofgod.com I and the Pastoral Team of our Young adults colaberates together on their site www.embassyonline.ca . I along with our Jr & Sr High Pastor Up date the Student Ministries site (www.embassystudents.ca)and our New Christians & Mens department pastor he works on the New Christians Site with his team. I know am working on a site for the kids department. So also I don't agree with the comment that Pastors should not have a hand at all in updating the site(s) at least 12 of our Pastors and Leaders all have a hand in the websites and what goes on.

Personally speaking if we do not have some Pastoral Updates then (like most) they do not know the content of the site and what is going on with it. I was at a church once back in the 90's and our Pastor only knew the end result of the site and nothing else he did no updates and left it up to his team. Some Pastors May like that but I know most do want some hand in the site. Especially some of the younger pastors today who love to promote their church and its ministries with a site.

I know myself as the guy who does the sermons online for the church, young adults and occosonally the Student Ministries I always want my hand in what is going on with our web tech. We do have one guy that oversees and reports to the pastors but like stated before we have many pastors involved.

So Yes I agree with your comment above.

Just one man's opinion
Be Blessed!
Matthew

Visit These Great Websites
www.embassyonline.ca (Young Adults)
www.embassystudents.ca (JR & SR High)
www.theembassyofgod.com (Main Site)
www.embassyworship.com (Worship Teams)
www.durhamhop.com (Durham House of Prayer)
www.matthewdykstra.site90.com

Matthew, The hosts of the

Matthew,
The hosts of the podcast stated that the Pastor should not be responsible for updating things like the calendar and homepage. Those things should be left to volunteers. However if the Pastor wants to update his page or blog, it should not be the volunteers responsibilty to do that.